Case Study: Patient Finally Heeds RDH’s Alert Over Lesion

Last spring, I treated a patient who I have seen routinely every six months for the past 11 years. Rob is a 75-year-old Caucasian male, heavy smoker, an upper denture wearer, has a history of skin cancer, very stubborn, and insurance-driven. Yet, we enjoy each other’s visits. We have been discussing tobacco cessation for 11 years now; I must confess that...

Canadian Hygienist Learns a Hard Lesson about Antibiotics and Joint Replacements

Antibiotic prophylaxis prior to dental treatment and hygiene therapy was considered an issue, and guidelines were set in place by the American Heart Association in 2007 for patients potentially at risk for bacterial endocarditis. In 2012, both the American Dental Association (ADA) and the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons (AAOS) agreed that patients with prosthetic joint replacements were also...

Taste Disorders: What Dental Hygienists Need to Know to Help Patients

Loss of taste is often regarded as less important when compared to vision and hearing loss. It is poorly studied because taste loss is not considered serious or life-threatening. The sense of taste, however, is essential to the overall health of dental patients.4 Also known as dysgeusia, taste disorders can be frustrating for patients and may negatively affect psychological well-being,...

Myofunctional Therapy: Expanding Dental Intervention

It seems that in the past, the main reason to refer a patient to a therapist was for a tongue thrust. We now have a wide variety of symptoms we need to be looking for which can be treated by a Myofunctional Therapist that can greatly improve our patients’ quality of life. Things such as malocclusion, long-term thumb sucking,...

Medical History: Your Patient is Not Telling You Everything

We’ve all heard it before when questioning a patient about their medical history, “There is no change.” Patients are so quick to tell us no change or that nothing pertains to their teeth in regards to their medical history. Little do these patients know their medical history is a big key to unlocking their dental health care assessment and...

Stop Diagnosing Pocketbooks and Treatment Plan Accordingly

When hygienists enter the field of dentistry, many present with hearts of gold. It is noticeable the minute you meet a hygienist; he/she cares about your health, family, and even more than can be imagined! Behind the compassionate hearts of hygienists, one can often find a hygienist worrying about how a patient will afford that newly diagnosed crown or...

Smoking Risks Higher in Women: The Dental Hygienist’s Role

It isn’t news that smoking is bad for your health. Cigarette smoking is responsible for more than 480,000 deaths each year and is the leading cause of preventable death. That equates to one in five deaths.1-3 More deaths are caused by smoking than human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), illegal drug use, alcohol use, motor vehicle accidents, and fire-arm related incidents.4...

Bridging the Gap Between Medical and Dental Health of Our Diabetic Patients

The bridge between medical and dental health is a hot topic and one we as dental hygienists cannot ignore! A lot is being done to try to build this bridge and shorten this gap, particularly with one of the most well-known and direct oral-systemic connections – diabetes and oral health. Our hygiene profession and the care we provide our...

What Should and What Should NOT be Written in a Patient’s Dental Record

A patient’s dental record is both a medical and a legal document. According to the American Dental Association, “The dental record also serves to provide continuity of care for the patient and is critical in the event of a malpractice insurance claim,” and the “information in the dental record should primarily be clinical in nature.” The following are examples of what is...

Not Just Another Set of Teeth: Building Patient Rapport

Building rapport is a term often used in a dental office. It can refer to relationships between other offices, coworkers, or most importantly our patients. To put it simply, rapport is a way of saying two people understand each other and the lines of communication are open.  When it comes to building patient rapport there will never be a...

Healthy Smiles, Healthy Practices

Trending Now

Most Recent

Don't Miss